Friday, 8 July 2016

Reasons to Quit Smoking

reasons-to-quit-smoking

We all know that smoking can in fact kill. Every year around 96,000 people in the UK alone die from diseases triggered from smoking however it's something still quite common in the world. In the UK smoking rates have halved since the 70s but there are still just under 1 in 5 adults in Great Britain who remain smokers. If you don't do it yourself then I'm quite certain you know someone that does or perhaps did in the past. My parents were both smokers, well actually my mum still is and I'll admit in my rebellious teenage years I gave it a try but I was quick to stop as I just didn't see the appeal. Many of those who smoke actually want to quit smoking but they sometimes lack a good reason to actually give up the habit.

My own mother is one of those people who has thought many times about quitting. She did manage to give up smoking for a time around fifteen years ago but unfortunately it didn't last for long. I think maybe she went about it the wrong way, going cold turkey. Your approach and thought process going into the situation make a huge difference. What needs to be remembered is that smoking is and addiction, a disease in itself and even if you have a strong desire to quit, patience is required as I don't believe going from being a smoker to a non smoker happens over night. 

But what reasons are there to quit smoking? What could compel someone to give up a habit that although bad for them appears to help them at times, a coping mechanism for things such as stress. I'm going to share with you just four reasons and I hope they inspire you to at least think about kicking those white sticks to the kerb.

1. Longevity of life

I don't think it will come as a surprise that by quitting smoking you will reduce the risk of developing certain diseases and not just cancer, it can also reduce risk for things such as strokes and heart disease. And of course those of you that suffer with the dreaded smokers cough will no doubt see those horrid symptoms like shortness of breath start to ease off and subside. Now who wouldn't want to live longer? The idea of cutting your life short, missing out on children/ grand children growing up, making memories with loved ones. Surely the thought of actually having a future where you remain healthy is good motivation to quite smoking?

This leads on to...

2. Protecting those around you

Smokers seem to regularly forget that their habits have a knock on affect to others around them. And not just their own friends and family but passers by who happen to get caught in their cloud of smoke. Passive smoking actually affected me whilst I was pregnant with my children, when giving birth I got accused of smoking because of the appearance of my placenta but after discussions with the midwives it turns out it was the effects of passive smoke from being around my own mum smoking. Now of course she didn't mean to cause harm but it goes to show just how dangerous it could be without you even knowing.

3. Being able to enjoy quality time with friends and family

As a non smoker I can tell you that I don't enjoy being around people when they smoke. I really dislike the smell whilst they are doing it and I don't like the odour it leaves on clothes, furniture, even hair afterwards. It makes me want to stand a distance away from them and surely smokers must notice this, it would be less lonely for them if they weren't to do it and of course it also means not having to stand outside (sometimes in the pouring rain) just to get their next nicotine hit whilst their companions carry on with conversations etc indoors.

4. Saving money

Now this would be a big motivator for me. Money does not grow on trees, although I really wish it did and smoking is quite an expensive habit to keep up. On average people save around £250 a month when they manage to quit smoking. So when you are enjoying your next fag just think that's £3000 a year literally going up in smoke. That could be the cost of your next holiday abroad, I know where I'd rather spend my money!

Yes quitting smoking can be tough, but the best things in life are the ones you have to work for. Wouldn't it be nice to be free of that addiction, to be able to go about your life without being interrupted by those cravings. Life really is better after tobacco. For more reasons to quit smoking, some of which you might never have thought of along with creative tips on how to do just CLICK RIGHT HERE and check them out.

Feel free to share in the comments your reasons to quit smoking or how you manage to finally kick the habit. 

9 comments:

  1. I used to smoke when I was in Uni and also when I started working, but was never a heavy smoker, so quitting wasn't hard for me. I just decided I didn't want to do it anymore. I hated the smell of it on my clothes and breath, by the time I turned 30, I just stopped.

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  2. I have never smoked but appreciate it must be very hard for those who do to quit.

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  3. I can hardly believe I am an ex smoker myself. I am surprised people even start these days with the knowledge they have

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  4. I'm currently a smoker and I hate myself for it, granted I've cut right down to 2 a day but those 2 a day seem to help, as much as I wish it didn't. Sometimes the fact it's 2 a day makes me think it's a waste of time but I'm not ready just yet to quit altogether. The cutting down for me over the past 6 months has worked for me so if it keeps going like this I should be stopped by Christmas! Fingers crossed.

    Jordanne || Thelifeofaglasgowgirl.co.uk

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  5. Such good advice for those that need it. I've never smoked but know people that have. The irony is they always say they are skint lol x

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  6. I was a smoker for 15 years but now I've got my daughter I've managed to quit. That's reason enough for me!

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  7. Must be incredibly hard to quit. Such good advice in this post. Xx

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  8. It must be so difficult to quit something you're completely addicted too. It takes a good 12 weeks of routine without something to start getting used to it, which is a long time to go through. But these are some amazing reasons to do it. Lucky (or unlucky) for me my only vice is wine. x

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  9. Would you like to figure out how to stop smoking cigarettes? How much of the time have you proclaimed to yourself or another person, "I truly need to surrender cigarettes," unifycosmos.com/quit-smoking/

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